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Grammar answers to 27 questions

Answer: 2. became The statement above refers to the past. Therefore it needs a verb in the past tense to complete it. The most suitable verb among the options provided is "became". "Had become" would have been the correct Answer…
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Answer: C. Exclamation point The exclamation point is closely associated with interjections. This is rightly so because interjections are words or phrases which often express emotions. The exclamation point is a punctuation mark that can be used to show emphatic…
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Answer: A "It" correctly completes the sentence because a telephone is a singular object which is also a noun. The term "it" can be used to replace a singular object and noun. The other options are incorrect because they don't…
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Temporal words are words that are used to show how time passes, or how a series of events move sequentially when elements in a story are being brought together. Temporal words are time-related. They function as helpers and prompters for…
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"Hence" is a conjunctive adverb that expresses the relationship between cause and effect in a statement. "Hence" can be replaced with "therefore", "as a result", etc., and should be immediately followed by a comma usually when a semicolon precedes it.…
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The most ideal way to ensure parallel construction when writing an essay is to make sure to use a similar sentence structure from paragraph to paragraph. This means repeating a chosen form of grammar or grammatical structure within a sentence.…
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Both "centre" and "centre" mean the same thing. Like with countless other English words, their usage and meaning depend on whether you're British or American. Both can be used to denote the point of focus or convergence of something. In…
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"PS" is an initialism that is commonly written at the end of documents and emails. It is an initialism of the Latin word "Postscriptum", which literally translates to "written after" or "after text". It is used when something is being…
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To "accept" is used to connote agreement with, or acceptance of something. For example: "Mildred has finally chosen to accept the truth." The word "except" is used when excluding something or a group from the rest. For example: "Share the…
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"Whilst" is the British form of the American "while". Either forms can be used to function as a conjunction describing events occurring at the same time. E.g. Do not talk whilst eating (British) Do not talk while eating (American) For…
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Both "dreamed" and "dreamt" are correct past terms of the word "dream", and are often used interchangeably. However, "dreamed" is commonly used in Anglophone countries, except Britain. In Britain, "dreamt" is more commonly used. Both can be used to refer…
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"Not only... but also" can serve as a connection between clauses that make sense as sentences individually, or when the second clause is an independent clause. In such cases, it is appropriate to use a comma. For example, "When cooking,…
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When it comes to song titles, generally, quotation marks are used instead of italics. For literary pieces with short texts/ works like song titles, articles, book chapters and so on, quotation marks are used. Italics are used for titles of…
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To differentiate between "former" and "latter", understand that "former" is used to refer to one of two things previously mentioned. On the other hand, "latter" is used to refer to the most recently mentioned part of a pair of something…
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The word "because" can function as a conjunction because it can be used to join two or more parts of a sentence together. It is used to denote the reason for something. For example, "I don't like bread because of…
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Like all English words, the use of "who's" and "whose" depends on the context. "Who's" is the contracted form of "who is", and is used to decipher who the performer of an action is. For example, "who's on the phone?"…
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When it comes to whether or not to input a comma before the clause "such as", it is important to consider the context. Typically, commas are used before "such as'' in non-essential clauses. i.e. clauses that make up a part…
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As a general rule, prepositions, conjunctions and articles are not capitalized in titles. These words are: "a", "an", "the", "and", "buy", "for", "nor", "or", "so", "yet", "after", "along", "around", "at", "by", "for", "from", "of", "on", "to", "with", and "without". Capitalize…
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The use of either "anytime" or "any time" depends on the context of formal or informal use. "Any time" is used in formal contexts. You can check if it should be used as one word if you can substitute it…
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The word "read", a homonym of "reed" belongs to the class of verbs known as irregular verbs, seeing as both the present and past tense are spelled the same way. The past tense of the word "read" is pronounced as…
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This may sound complex but is easy to understand and use it. The imperfect tense is a verb tense that refers to the past, especially when giving descriptions of things that happened during that time. For instance, “She used to…
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Less is commonly confused with fewer. They are comparative forms that are used differently based on the noun they are applied to. Less is used with uncountable nouns such as water, milk, and chemicals and so on. You cannot count…
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Many writers have struggled with this before learning the best way to deal with punctuation quotation.  There are rules based on American and British English. However, he is a general rule you want to consider: Commas, periods, question marks, and…
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Before defining what a dangling participle is, it is good to define the term participle. A participle is simply an adjective that comes from a verb. For instance a working husband. Therefore, working here is a participle used to describe…
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Some people have often written affect while they wanted to write effect. This can completely change the intended meaning in the writing because: Affect is a verb written to imply change or impact. When used in a sentence, it should…
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Its and it’s are probably among the most confused words in English. While they appear similar, they are completely different in their meaning. Here is the difference: Its – this is a possessive pronoun that means the quality of it…
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There are four different types of questions in English grammar. Here they are with examples to help you understand them better: General Questions. These are questions that call for a Yes or No answer. The question relates to the entire…
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